Matching Jewelry and Stones to Marsala & Pantone’s Other Spring 2015 “En Plein Air” Color Choices – A Hunter Ridge Spring Jewelry Guide

Easter Blue Topaz

Pantone’s annual color report is out and its time to consider the jewelry that best compliments the season’s colors and attitude. Spring is generally a time for awakenings – metaphorically and physically – and is thus a great time to get in touch with your lighter side. This year’s color choices mesh well with that goal.

Easter Blue Topaz

 

 

Fortunately, there exist a wondrous menagerie of natural, affordable gemstones that fall both in, and around, this Spring’s vaulted palette. Marsala is the color of the year, and while it’s possible to use jewelry to match or at least “color block” in this tone, we’d suggest bringing the color to life in your clothing and then using jewelry to brush in some of  the season’s other colors that happen to synergize well with Marsala.

Marsala’s rich tone is perhaps best matched to the blue-green spectrum and luckily for us, there’s an almost unending assortment of blue-green’s that can be easily and affordably accessed with a variety of copper bearing gemstones. These of course include members of the Turquoise Family. Turquoise owes its rich green and blue colors to copper salts that stew with the stone during its creation. Just think about how a clever copper roof turns green after a few years in the elements.

The jaw-dropping earrings pictured at the top of this post were crafted by famed Santo Domingo jeweler and lapidarist Jimmy Cabeza. They feature two thin book-matched slices of natural Easter blue turquoise. Stunning statement pieces that won’t go unnoticed.

Easter Blue Turquoise

For that same Easter Blue color in a more budget-friendly edition, try something like these square,  vintage, unattributed earrings. They were also crafted in the tribal Southwest, but alas we do not have the benefit of knowing the artist.

See all of our turquoise pieces here

LARIMAR

The ever popular Dominican gemstone, Larimar aka “Stefilia’s Stone” is a springtime favorite. The stone is named for the “sea” and truly lives up to the moniker. Light Caribbean blues blend with sheer whites and greys to create an inviting pool of color that anyone can jump right into.

Larimar has recently become more popular, but there was a time when you could source it only on location in the Dominican Republic. It’s a form of pectolite, and like turquoise, derives its unmatched blue color from copper salts.

Larimar Pendant

 

While not a copper bearing mineral, we would be remiss not to mention the oft forgotten Blue Chalcedony and its cousin Chrysoprase. These simple stone lie in the vast family of cryptocrystalline silicas (see our blog on them here). The blues and greens in these beauties can be attributed primarily to traces of nickel oxide.

 

The single “true blue” identified by Pantone this year is labeled “Classic Blue” and Lapis Lazuli is an obvious match. Prized for millennia, the best specimens of this rich blue stone hail from Afghanistan (see our blog on Lapis Here). It creates a symbiotic contrast with Marsala toned clothing

lapis1Lapis2

Above are two awesome vintage pieces. The first piece is a hinged necklace with fine grade lapis set in 950 silver. It’s an entirely artisan crafted classic circa 1970’s.. The second piece is a super rare 800 silver (see our silver article here) and very fine lapis cabochon Bali necklace from pre-1970. This is the color most people associate with lapis. The pieces below feature the slightly less common “denim” lapis and are both Southwest tribal pieces.

 denim1denim2

See all of our Lapis jewelry here

Also on this year’s spectrum are earth tones “Custard” and “Toasted Almond” This is a great opportunity to look to humbler minerals like Marble, Agate and Quartz — but also certain varieties of opaque and translucent amber.

Agate1Agate2

 Antique Scottish Agate Flower Pin Circa 1900 and a Tova Jewels designer yellow agate chunky link statement bracelet

See all of our agate here.

The yellow quartz gems, including citrine, are a super affordable way to add yellow glamour to your get-up. These stones reflect the angular spring sun and glow from within.

quartz

Simply classic large yellow quartz cocktail ring.  

See our citrine here

Amber is another obvious choice for yellow and mustard. This versatile gem can be soft and understated or bright and ambitious. Read our article on finding genuine amber here and see all our amber jewelry here.

Amber earrings  Amber tie bar 

The amber dangle earrings are from Poland and feature natural Baltic amber. The tie bar is a vintage Russian piece with a column of rich golden amber. 

If you want to skip the accessory colors and go right for the muted reds “Strawberry” and “Marsala”, it might seem a challenge at first blush, but don’t be discouraged. These color combos are easily achieved with members of the Jasper Family.

Marsala AgateMarasala agate 2

These earrings by Joanna Laura Constantine feature natural agate panels that run the spectrum of red from marsala to fire. The ring is an antique circa 1900 featuring a blood agate cabochon.

See our reddish agates here, and jasper here.

 If you want to hit the full Spectrum — then there is no better choice than natural fluorite. It’s impossible-to-reproduce color variety just screams SPRING!!

$_57

How to Spot Counterfeit Fake Tiffany & Co. Jewelry – How to tell if it’s authentic Tiffany

Mimicry is often labeled the ultimate form of flattery. I can assure you, however, that Tiffany & Co. is not flattered by the small number of con-artists who manufacture cheap jewelry and then stamp it with the T & Co. name in order to capitalize on Tiffany’s hard earned reputation. The purpose of this guide is to help you sort out the real McCoy from the wannabees.

The surest way to buy authentic T & Co. jewelry is go directly to Tiffany’s website, a Tiffany Authorized re-seller or a Tiffany Boutique. For those of us who cannot afford to buy new pieces, or simply choose to buy estate pieces, it can be difficult to know when we are getting the real thing and when we’re being duped. Experienced Tiffany buyers will tell you that there is simply no comparison between the feel and look of the real thing versus the cheap copies being hocked at street bazaars and shady online stores. However, if you don’t have a lot of hands on experience, you can be fooled by some of the clever fakes. What you need is a quick guide to help you identify the tell-tale signs of a counterfeit piece.

1. Soldered Links:

Links on Tiffany Jewelry should be soldered continuous links. There should not be a line where the link can be separated. This is a very common give-away on fakes. In the photos below you can see a counterfeit Tiffany heart toggle necklace and a close-up of the links. This necklace was sold to us by a silver dealer.

T1Capture1

Compare the links in the necklace above to the links in the authentic Tiffany heart toggle piece below. Note how the smooth perfectly round links on the real one have no seams:

RealClose RealLinks

2. Perfection:

All stamps, logos and lines on a piece of modern Tiffany jewelry should be perfect. Below, take a look at the bangle in the top two photos. While it might look convincing from a distance, the Cartouche around the 1837 logo is off center and crooked. We purchased this bracelet from a website for $190.00. The site refunded our money without question when we complained that it was not authentic. You would never see a crooked logo like this on an authentic Tiffany bangle like the one on the bottom. Also – you can actually see the brass coming through the engraving on the top photo. Like most fakes, it is silver plated brass (sometimes copper or zinc as well). Note that on vintage and antique pieces, the Tiffany logo will appear on the back of the piece – these back marks are sometimes less than perfect.

Tiffany 1837 Fake1837 fake2

1837 Real

3. Font:

Newer authentic Tiffany pieces that actually use the full name “Tiffany & Co.” will almost always use a larger T and larger C.  If the piece has all uniform letters, you should investigate it further because it may be a fake. For vintage pieces, this rule goes out the window. The marks TIFFANY & CO. and even just “TIFFANY 18K” were used on genuine vintage Tiffany pieces.

4.  Silver Content:

Authentic Tiffany jewelry will always be marked with a fineness mark (aka “purity mark” and sometimes mistakenly called a “hallmark”). For sterling silver pieces the purity mark will be either “925” or “Sterling”, the latter being more common on vintage pieces.  The content of the piece will be 92.5% silver.  While Tiffany did make some large silver plated tea platters in the early part of the 20th century, Tiffany jewelry, especially modern pieces, is all solid silver. If you have a test kit, you can safely perform a touchstone test. If not, inspect the piece closely with a magnifying glass for wear. Pay particular attention to stamped and engraved areas as well as joints. As you can see the fake 1837 bracelet above, it is sometimes possible to see the base metal coming through the silver. Look at the 1827 ingot necklace below. We used sand paper to remove the outer silver layer and expose the underlying brass. IMPORTANTLY — magnets will not distinguish between sterling silver and silver plated brass — magnets are in fact rarely ever a reliable test for silver.

ingot

SUPER FAKES

Though not common, you might sometimes encounter what we call “super fakes”. These pieces will fool even an experienced jeweler. We recently came across a heart tag “super fake” which appears below.

SuperFake1

 

 

 

 

 

Unlike the examples described above, this bracelet is made from solid sterling silver. It also features soldered links, which can be seen in the photo below.

 

 

SuperFake2

 

 

 

 

 

There are still some details which give it away as a fake. Let’s start with the Back of the donut loop. The 925 mark is askew, uneven and off strike.

Superfake3

 

 

 

 

 

The letters on the heart tag bleed into the top surface.

SuperFakeBleed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The welds and joints are generally sloppy. See photos below.

Sloppy3 Sloppy2 Sloppy1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Heart tag is also domed, has a grainy texture and varies in thickness. It is also not signed on the back — which is not always fatal — but in this case, seals the deal.

Conclusion

When in doubt — don’t buy it.  Always ask questions and don’t be afraid to ask for more pictures / closeups  if you are buying online.  Never buy a piece if the seller is representing it as “I was told” “I think this is authentic” or “Buy at your own risk”. It’s just not worth the headache. Please feel free to ask us any questions you may have. Thanks as always for reading our jewelry blog! Please also visit our ebay store if you are in the market for jewelry today!

JEWELRY as an INVESTMENT for the Regular Person

 

Jewelry as investmentContrary to popular belief, jewelry can be a valuable and dependable form of investment — if it is acquired intelligently with a focus on current value.  In fact, for most of human history, jewelry was a simple, dependable and convenient means for storing wealth in a quasi-functional form.  Changes in economic models, global and domestic economies, the global fashion industry, advertising norms, and the commonality of person-to-person transactions have drastically impacted the usefulness of jewelry as an investment vehicle. These changes began in earnest in the 19th century and progressed very rapidly in the second half of the 20th century. As a result of these economic and cultural forces, jewelry investment has become less common for most of us.  However, jewelry investment remains an excellent way to store wealth and insulate yourself from inflation. How do you accomplish these goals? The answer may be pretty simple: make educated acquisitions of preowned jewelry.  And, we are talking about jewelry that can be purchased by the average person, as opposed to gems of exceptional rarity or museum quality pieces.

Read more JEWELRY as an INVESTMENT for the Regular Person

The Difference between Silver, Sterling Silver, 900 Silver, 800 Silver, Alpaca, Nickel Silver and Silver Plated Jewelry

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Vintage Sterling Silver Wide Cuff Bracelet with Dimpled Rope Pattern (American Tribal, 1970’s)

This article looks at the difference between the various metals used for jewelry that include the word “silver” or are often mistaken for silver. It is a companion piece to our article on gold and gold jewelry. If you buy silver jewelry for collectible purposes, business purposes or simply because it’s beautiful, it is important to know exactly what you are buying. The purpose of this guide is to prepare you, as a consumer, when shopping for silver jewelry.

Before getting into jewelry specifics, it’s good to have a grasp on some of the fundamentals of silver. Silver, like gold, is an elemental metal. This means that pure silver is made up of nothing but silver atoms (represented on the periodic table by the symbol Ag). Other examples of elemental metals include copper, aluminum, platinum, iron and lead.

In its pure elemental form, silver has a white metallic appearance. It also has a high luster (shiny), is very soft (scratches easily) and is quite malleable (can be hammered into different shapes). When people discuss the “price of silver” or “spot price of silver” or “silver bullion prices” they are referring to pure elemental silver, or more exactly, 99.9% pure silver.

raw silver
Raw Natural SIlver with White Matrix

“Pure” metals, like elemental silver or elemental copper, are distinguished from metal alloys – which are metals made up of two “pure metals”. For example, brass is an alloy that is made up of copper and zinc. To make brass, copper and zinc are melted together. Likewise, one can make various silver alloys by combing silver with other elemental metals.

Silver jewelry can be made from near pure silver (99.9% silver known as “fine silver”) or one of any number of alloys. Fine silver (99.9%) jewelry is somewhat uncommon. The most common silver alloy used in jewelry today is “Sterling” silver, which consists of 92.5% silver and 7.5% some other metal (often copper, but sometimes zinc). The majority of silver jewelry in the United States, and most developed nations, is made from “Sterling” (92.5%) or finer silver.

Fineness Marks and Hallmarks

Because different alloys of silver contain different percentages of pure silver, it is important to know which alloy was used to make a piece of jewelry. For several hundred years now, most major silver manufacturing countries use what are known as “fineness marks”, “hallmarks” or a combination of both.

A fineness mark is a mark put on a piece of jewelry to indicate the percentage of pure silver it contains. There are two common types of fineness marks for silver – word marks and numerical marks. The numerical marks usually represent the number of parts of pure silver out of 1000 contained in a piece of silver. For example, Sterling silver is 92.5% silver or 925 out of 1000 parts silver. This simply means that by weight, the piece is 925 parts silver and 75 parts some other metal. Therefore the “shorthand” mark “925” is used to indicate that something is sterling silver. Other common numerical marks include:

800  (80% silver or 800/1000)

PTDC0006

 

 

 

 

830  (83%silver of 830/1000)

830

 

 

 

835  (83.5% silver or 835/1000)

PTDC0015

 

 

 

 

 

 

900  (90% silver or 900/1000)

950  (95% silver or 950/1000)

950

 

 

 

 

 

980 (98% silver or 980/1000)

980

 

 

 

 

999  (99.9% silver or 999/1000)

As mentioned above, fineness can also be indicated by a word. The two most common words encountered in the United States are “Sterling” and “Coin”. Sterling is, as discussed above, 92.5% silver.PTDC0011

 

 

 

 

 

“Coin” means that the item is 90% silver. The term “coin” is a reference to early coins which were made out of 90% silver. It is very unusual to see the mark “Coin” on pieces made after 1900. Some silver jewelry is marked just “silver”. This is common on British territory (e.g. Chinese export silver) pieces and indicates “Sterling Silver”. Also, there are several abbreviations for Sterling Silver in use now or in the past including:

“SS” (this mark can be confusing because a lot of stainless steel is also marked SS)

“STG.”

“Stg. Sil.” (example photo below)

STG SIL

 

 

 

 

U.S. Law (and the law of most developed countries) prohibits the marking of any non-silver item with a silver purity mark. (See, for example, 15 U.S.C. 8 S. 296). However, a set of stamps to make these marks can be purchased online for about $20.00 —- by anyone. Therefore, the fineness mark can only be trusted as much as the person who put it there.

Hallmarks Distinguished

Unlike a fineness mark, a hallmark is a mark that indicates that an official (usually a local assayer) in a particular country guarantees that the item is made from a certain percentage of silver. While hallmarks can also be counterfeited, it is somewhat unusual.  Hallmarks usually consist of a picture or a combination of a picture and text. Pictures used are often of local or historically important animals, current or prior rulers / sovereigns and certain plants.

The United States does not use hallmarks. However, many countries with far greater histories of silver-smithing employ or did employ at one time, a complex hallmarking system. There are a number of excellent guides available on the internet that can assist you in identifying a particular hallmark. Our favorite is 925-1000.com. Set forth  below is a common example of a hallmark previously used in Mexico and often encountered on vintage silver jewelry found at U.S. Fleamarkets, Yard Sales, and Estate Sales.

PTDC0008

 

 

 

 

This Mexican Mark is meant to represent an eagle. It really does not look anything like an eagle in most examples. Be weary of eagle head marks on Mexican jewelry. Those are counterfeit marks and are quite common on tourist bangles.

If you encounter an item that is not marked with a fineness mark or hallmark, or an item that does have such a mark but you suspect is not silver, you will need to test the item  or have it tested by someone else. With experience, it will become less and less necessary to test such items. See our article on testing silver for more info (to be published on or about June 15,2014) or simply google “silver testing”.

 Silver Plate and Silver Filled Jewelry 

In addition to real silver jewelry, there are two common substitutes that use small amounts of silver to mimic the real thing: Silver Plated Jewelry and Silver Filled Jewelry. There is nothing wrong with this type of jewelry  – as long as it’s not marked or sold as real silver jewelry.

Silver Plated jewelry is NOT real silver. It is brass, copper or other metal jewelry that has a very thin layer of silver applied on the surface. There is no calculable value to the amount of silver in silver plated jewelry so it should be judged on its aesthetic, artistic and collectible qualities rather than its inherent metal value. Most silver plated jewelry in the marketplace today is electro-plated. Electroplating is a chemical process where a base metal item (e.g. a copper brooch) is placed in an electrolytic solution and connected to the “cathode” end of an electrical circuit (e.g. a large battery).  A piece of silver is connected to the “anode” end of the circuit and then placed in the solution apart from the copper piece. Electrical current carries tiny silver “cations” from the silver bar to the surface of the copper piece. With sufficient time, a thin layer of silver forms over the copper piece. Once the process is complete, the copper piece appears to be made from silver.

Silver Plated jewelry often does not have any mark on it anywhere that would indicate it was silver plated. Occasionally you will, however, see the following marks:

“SP” – meaning Silver Plate

“Plate” – more common on flatware and table pieces

“EP” – meaning electroplated

“Quadruple Plate” – allegedly meaning the piece went through electrolysis four times

“EPNS” – meaning electroplated nickel silver

“S80” – this is a mark that appears on a lot of Chinese silver colored jewelry that is often also marked 925. This is not silver jewelry. It is merely plated with “925” Sterling Silver.  S80 Silver is apparently a plating compound in many emerging market countries.

Sometimes the silver plate mark is confusingly blended with marks that look like hallmarks. This is especially common on pieces imported from Britain and Holland. Do not be fooled by these marks. An example appears below. Another confusing mark on silver plated pieces is the name of a manufacturer that includes the word “silver” such as “International Silver Co.” or “American Silver Co.”. These names do not mean that the item is silver. Rather if there is no mark indicating purity on the piece (e.g. 925 of “Sterling” or a hallmark), then the piece is almost certainly silver plated.

PTDC0016
Example of the EP mark meaning “Electro Plated”

 

 

 

 

 

Silver Filled jewelry is jewelry that is made by taking two thin sheets of silver and pressing between them a sheet of brass, copper or other base metal. It is not very common. It is akin to “gold filled” jewelry. Silver Filled jewelry has a quantifiable amount of silver in it (often 1/5th by weight but also as low as 1/20th). Silver Filled jewelry goes in and out of use based on the spot price of silver. When silver becomes expensive, silver filled jewelry gets more popular. Common marks for silver filled jewelry are:

“Silver Filled”

“1/5th Sterling” (sometimes consisting of only one sheet of silver on top of brass, copper etc.).

“1/20th Sterling”

“Sterling Cap” (always consisting of only one sheet of silver on top of brass, copper etc.).

Nickel Silver

Nickel Silver goes by many names and often looks exactly like silver to the untrained eye. However, the one thing it’s not, is silver. Nickel Silver contains absolutely NO silver — zilch, zero, nada. It is a metal alloy formed by combining copper, nickel and zinc. Except when newly polished, it has a luster and often “greens” (oxidizes) with age. It is very common in Mexican and Latin American tourist pieces where it is sometimes termed Alpaca.

Alpaca (Nickle SIlver) Cuff Bracelet
Alpaca (Nickle Silver) Cuff Bracelet

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other common names and marks on Nickel Silver jewelry include:

German silver

NS

EPNS (electroplated nickel silver)

Electrum

There is nothing wrong with Nickel Silver jewelry and some of it is quite beautiful. However, it’s important to know you are buying nickel silver and not real silver. We are especially fond of early Mexican Alpaca jewelry that quite often features genuine gemstones. It has become a nice collectible in its own right and is much more affordable than silver jewelry.

Other Imitators

There exist countless other “silver” colored metals and even plastics that can be mistaken for real silver. When in doubt, have the items tested by a professional or learn to test silver yourself. In time, you will be able to distinguish all of these substitutes based solely on weight, look and feel. Please feel to free ask any questions or suggest additional details that might make this post more effective. Thanks as always for reading out blog!

 

How to tell Real Amber vs Fake Amber Jewelry and Everything In Between

This is a home guide for distinguishing real amber from fake amber. We welcome your comments!

The warm glow and smooth feel of natural amber has captivated humanity for thousands of years. This unique gem falls within the class of jewelry materials known as “organics” because it originates from the living world. Like Coral, Pearls, Jet, Ebony and Ivory, it is the byproduct of a living thing and served a unique purpose in the ecosystem long before it was recognized for its aesthetic value by human beings.

Amber Earrings Top
Vintage Sterling Silver & Amber Earrings from our ebay store

Amber is a prized material for jewelry and other accessories. Unfortunately, there are dozens of tricky substitutes for amber that are often mistaken for the real thing. The purpose of this article is to help the casual observer distinguish between fakes and real amber.

Before delving into the specifics, it is important to have an understanding of the nature and origin of natural amber. All amber began as resin oozing from the exterior of an ancient (at least 2 Million years ago) tree (unlike sugar bearing sap, resin originates from the exterior of tree and serves a variety of protective purposes). You can see modern tree resin on most pine trees at points wear a lost limb or other injury caused the tree to exude resin.

The resin from these ancient trees was transported by nature into lakes, swamps and marine environments where it underwent a polymerization process known as “amberization”. The chemical make-up of the resin was actually changed during this process and gives amber the unique qualities that make it suitable for use in jewelry. Amberization, under most conditions, requires at least 2 Million years. If the Amberization process is interrupted before sufficient time has passed, the result is a not fully polymerized material known as Copal.

With that introduction to amber in mind, we can proceed to field observations and analysis that will help distinguish between amber and its substitutes.

There are 4 general things that can be mistaken for Amber: 1) modern plastics / resins; 2) vintage plastics and pre-plastics; 3) glass and silicon based minerals (e.g. Carnelian); and 4) other tree resins. Through basic observation and some limited home-testing, you can confidently distinguish amber from these substitutes. With time and practice, testing becomes less necessary.

Read more How to tell Real Amber vs Fake Amber Jewelry and Everything In Between